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  #1  
Old 02-01-2007, 09:23 PM
stingray stingray is offline
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Default Bike Setup

set your sag

check your wear

twist the throttle
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Old 02-01-2007, 10:12 PM
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What about the chains and brakes...nothing to worry about there? I know on the DSR I have to change the chain twice a year but it might be that the car weighs 1000lbs versus the bike being 300-400.
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  #3  
Old 02-23-2007, 04:35 AM
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Bike prep advice ...

Tyres Are you happy with the tyres? Check the pressures and condition.
A second hand set of wet race tyres can usually be picked up for a reasonable sum and can mean the difference between a miserable day and an enjoyable one.
Similarly track focused tyres such as Pirelli Supercorsas will be a great addition on a warm day.
Ultimately a spare set of wheels with tyres will limit any effect the weather can have on your day
A worthwhile purchase, should you want to do trackdays more frequently is a pair of Tyre warmers. There is no better confidence booster than a pair of nicely warm tyres at the start of the session!

Brakes Check the brakes and the hydraulic systems. Check the wear on the pads and again remember that you may use them more than you do normally

Suspension If you know how to, you can set up the bike for a smoother track as opposed to the compromise settings for the road. If not get advice from someone who does

Exhaust We know race cans sound nice. But many trackdays have noise limits. That Akroprovic full race system might sound and look great, but on a Donington 'quiet' day it could spell an early end to the day.
Check with the organiser for noise limits.

Chain makes sure it is adjusted and well lubricated

Petrol / Oil Do you have enough fuel to last all day? Most circuits have a fuel supply but the cost will be high. Well worth taking a fuel can of your own

Bodywork A set of cheap pattern bodywork will be a lot less painful should it all go wrong on the day. A couple of hours preparing the bike beforehand can save you pounds later. But if you are keeping the standard stuff on then tape up the lights and fold back or remove the mirrors
Many bikes get fitted with crash bungs these days. A pair of these costing a few quid could be a good investment for road or track.

Transport At the end of an enjoyable day it is not always much fun to have to ride a few hours home. A trailer or van borrowed or rented will make the journey easier. as well as allowing the track preparation to be done prior to the day

Ultimately a lot depends on your budget. the cheapest way is to book your day. Ride there, have fun and ride home. But a bit of preparation can make all the difference to your enjoyment.
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Old 06-28-2007, 01:15 PM
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ridgerunner ridgerunner is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jstecher View Post
What about the chains and brakes...nothing to worry about there? I know on the DSR I have to change the chain twice a year but it might be that the car weighs 1000lbs versus the bike being 300-400.

Modern O-ring chains on sportbikes will last anywhere from 8,000 miles to 20,000+ miles. Alot of variables weigh in on the life of a chain. Proper maintenance is the number one factor. Add to that proper tension, and observation of wearing parts. My last chain and sprockets were replaced at 12,000 miles on the Tuono, and they still had alot of life left in them.

Many track riders will switch to a 520 chain and hard anodized aluminum sprockets from a 525 or even 530 pitch chain and steel sprockets to reduce the amount of unsprung weight from the motorcycle. In my case, I saved almost 3 pounds of weight by performing the 520 conversion. The driveline won't last as long as stock, but the performance gains are well worth it.
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  #5  
Old 01-04-2008, 07:42 PM
SD26 SD26 is offline
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I like to look at the spring rates of the bikes I ride first as part of my set up program. Bikes vary dramatically. As an example, a Honda CBR600F4i has front fork springs that are appropriate for a 75# track day rider. A 2007 GSXR750 has front fork springs that are appropriate for a 220# track day rider.

Support starts at the springs. It's relatively easy and inexpensive to replace and change them to something more correct.
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Old 01-07-2008, 07:18 AM
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Originally Posted by SD26 View Post
I like to look at the spring rates of the bikes I ride first as part of my set up program. Bikes vary dramatically. As an example, a Honda CBR600F4i has front fork springs that are appropriate for a 75# track day rider. A 2007 GSXR750 has front fork springs that are appropriate for a 220# track day rider.

Support starts at the springs. It's relatively easy and inexpensive to replace and change them to something more correct.

I'd like to see the sources that gave you this data. I've never seen the oem spring rates from front forks published.
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Old 01-07-2008, 08:48 AM
SD26 SD26 is offline
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All the recent service manuals have them now. The Race Tech site has a spring calculator, and that's where you can find quick data though. You can work the data backwards to see what rider weight the OEM spring is set up for and that correlates with some experiences we've had with those bikes...F4's having way too light front springs...recent GSXR's being sprung heavily...current R6's having good front springs for a lot of riders but being a bit heavy on the back for some mid to light riders.
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Old 01-07-2008, 01:24 PM
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Makes sense it would be in the svc manuals. I haven't received my copies yet for the SV. The front forks are already at the suspension shop being fitted w/ race-tech springs and emulators. The rear shock is at Ohlins being exchanged for a spring w/ the correct weight.

Hopefully in two weeks I'll be able to set static sag and see how the new suspenders work.
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  #9  
Old 08-26-2009, 09:26 AM
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SaCymn SaCymn is offline
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Default Bike Setup

the bike looks even better in person...

lots of lil detail everywhere..

might as well sell your 600 rr sicne this is officially the new pimp bike.
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